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Pre-loved profitability: used machines can pay

With digital print having become a fixture in the industry (it hit its silver jubilee last year) you might think that as the market became established a strong secondhand market would have emerged offering the canny printer more affordable machinery.

Used kit can be a bargain if you can take away the risk

Buy right or buy twice. It’s sage advice and when it comes to equipment, the quandary that print has to deal with is whether to purchase new or secondhand. Some will instinctively want to use a brand new machine, others will calculate that secondhand offers better value.

Pressing questions: who’s made progress since Drupa?

It has now been 18 months since the big Drupa exhibition in Germany in May 2016, so it’s a good point to look at what’s happened to the many digital production presses that were unveiled there, plus a few of the significant developments or announcements since.

Learning on the job

In reality TV the contestant’s journey – the struggle to become the best possible them – is a device to increase the entertainment value. In business there’s a more serious side to going on a journey, which is to drive higher profitability through continuous improvement.

Me & my: Komori Lithrone S529 H-UV

According to Loop Print managing director Chris Gray, “each individual in our team has their own specialist skills they bring to the business”. But could those individuals step up to the mark when the litho and digital printer in South Yorkshire bought a Komori Lithrone S29?

A tale of innovation over two centuries

This year marks the 200th anniversary of Koenig & Bauer, which was the first manufacturer in the world to make a motorised cylinder printing press and is the oldest press maker still in existence.

Digital tech takes corrugated to the next level

Corrugated looks set to be the next big adopter of high-speed single-pass digital printing technologies. It’s a natural progression up in capacity from the big flatbed industrial inkjets that are already fairly common sights in the sector.

Sitting comfortably II: more views from the red sofa

There was never any doubt that digital was always going to be a hot topic at Drupa. In terms of product launches, star turns, largely from the show’s birthday boy, and the sheer scale of the digital collective’s presence at the Messe – not to mention that one of their own was the show’s single biggest exhibitor – it was always going to be thus.

Go fourth and automate

At Drupa we saw the future and its name is Print 4.0. It is a ‘mega trend’ all about automation and integration. Here we look at what this paradigm shift in printing practices may mean for the industry.

Cleaner and dryer days with LE-UV

Picture the scene. A client calls and urgently needs a job printed on uncoated stock, finished and ready by tomorrow. Not a difficult scenario to envisage in this day and age, but a job that many specialist litho printers would still struggle to accommodate, in-house at least.

Revamps outstrip new launches as market picks up

If you look back over the four years since the last Drupa, or even the past decade, you won’t see much that’s revolutionary happening in conventional printing presses. Yet they’ve steadily become more efficient, more reliable, and their productivity has gained as a result.

B2 or not B2?

With Drupa 2016 just over the horizon but no new press announcements made so far, it’s time to ask: who needs B2 digital or bigger?

Why it pays to straighten up and fly right

Should a printer define itself by the equipment it uses or by its customers? Marketing theory would suggest the latter, but with the high prices and long pay-back times of presses there’s a risk you may find you fall into the former by default if you don’t keep an eye on the markets you serve and invest accordingly.

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