Schwartz grows PUR binding with Morgana investment

By Richard Stuart-Turner, Thursday 22 December 2016

Be the first to comment

Schwartz Printing has upgraded its PUR binding capabilities by investing around £70,000 in a Morgana DigiBook 450.

schwartz2

The DigiBook 450 is suitable for both litho and digitally printed products

The new 450bph system, which was installed at the Brentwood-based firm’s 929sqm premises last month, has replaced a DigiBook 150, which has been part exchanged. The DigiBook 450 is suitable for both litho and digitally printed products.

Schwartz originally brought PUR binding in-house in 2014 when it installed the DigiBook 150. Director Chris Futcher said the machine served the company well as a starting point but that its workload in this area has continued to grow over time.

“The 150 gave us the ability to take on work if it was PUR bound but it didn’t have the ability to mill off the back that you need with litho, so that’s why we decided to go down this route in order to keep more work in-house and keep us more in control.

“The 450 also incorporates much more automation, as well as offering a faster throughput, and can be run very effectively with just one operator.”

The firm also considered a range of alternatives before settling on the Morgana device, which Futcher said was “the most flexible”.

“There’s no point in buying something cheap if it doesn’t do a good job and all of Morgana’s equipment does a good job,” he said.

“Training went well because our guys already understood the gluing part of it which, to a degree, is the main bit you could fall foul of if you don’t clean the machine properly. They took to it like a duck to water.”

The company also runs a six-colour B1 Komori Lithrone 640, two Ricoh digital printers, a Pro C9110 and a Pro C7100, and finishing kit including a Muller Martini 335 saddle stitcher and two MBO folders.

Schwartz Printing has 13 staff and turned over around £1.4m last year. It produces general commercial print as well as work for clients including theatres, solicitors and local councils.

Share this

This Issue

Latest comments